Electrocution Remains A Workplace Safety Hazard

Electrocutions can happen both at work and at home due to defective products, lack of safety precautions and power company negligence. The Electrical Safety Foundation International, or ESFI, reports more than 30,000 electricity-related injuries on the job in the past 10 years. Some of these may have occurred in Illinois. It is important that victims of negligence or inadequate safety precautions, or families of victims, contact a personal injury lawyer experienced in dealing with such cases.

Coming Into Contact With Live Wires While Working Is a Common Problem

Two men made headlines in December after they were electrocuted in two separate incidents. A 35-year-old man working in Largo, Florida, died on Dec. 14 when he was electrocuted while painting a building. The man reportedly touched live wires with his ladder and died At scene, according to police reports.

The second man, of Boca Raton, Florida, was reportedly electrocuted on Dec. 20 while attempting to fix an air conditioner on the roof of a warehouse. According to police, the 37-year-old man, who was working as an independent contractor, was injured after he came into contact with an exposed wire. Responders tried to revive the man, but he was declared dead after being transported to Broward Health North Medical Center. Both incidents are still under investigation.

It is important for the wiring in buildings to be properly maintained and kept up to code to avoid things like exposed live wires, which pose a serious risk of injury or death to workers. The ESFI has a wealth of information as far as safety precautions and proper handling of electric equipment and wires, but as evidenced by the statistics the organization gathers and presents on injuries and fatalities, negligence still happens, and people continue to get hurt.

Finding a Qualified Lawyer to Handle Your Case

If another party was negligent in maintaining proper safety procedures or keeping electrical wiring safe and up to code, it may be possible for those injured, or family members in the case of a fatality, to seek compensation for medical bills, lost time at work and even pain and suffering through a personal injury lawsuit.

If you or someone you know was a victim of electrocution and you believe someone else was at fault, you should discuss the particulars of your situation with an Illinois personal injury lawyer who understands how to work with insurance companies and whether to take a settlement or present your case to a jury.